Kelly Knivila

Kelly Knivila

Kelly Knivila is a healthcare regulatory lawyer who specializes in helping clients solve problems with federal and state regulatory agencies. She has deep experience in the Medicaid program having spent over two decades representing Medicaid Managed Care Organizations, providers and state Medicaid agencies on a wide array of regulatory issues. Kelly also regularly counsels clients on a variety of other healthcare regulatory requirements including Medicare audits and billing requirements, physician self-referral laws (the federal Stark Law and similar state laws), the anti-kickback statute, compliance programs, self-disclosures and internal investigations.

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Stoel Rives’ Health Care Attorneys Contribute to PBJ ‘Health Care of the Future’ Special Publication

Stoel Rives recently continued its long-time sponsorship of the  Portland Business Journal Health Care of the Future awards. A special publication for the awards includes a collaboration by Stoel Rives’ attorneys Todd Hanchett, Tim Hatfield, Kelly Knivila and Sarah Oyer on an article addressing four current trends in health care.  Topics covered include behavioral health … Continue Reading

Non-Urgent and Elective Procedures Update: Oregon and Washington Ease Prohibitions

In a previous Health Law Insider blog post, Stoel Rives’ health care team discussed the prohibition on elective procedures promulgated by Oregon and Washington in an effort to conserve the states’ supply of Personal Protective Equipment (“PPE”) and manage provider treatment capacity to ensure adequate resources were available to combat COVID-19. Recently, Oregon and Washington … Continue Reading

HHS Distributes $30 Billion from CARES Act Public Health Emergency Funds

On April 10, 2020, HHS announced the distribution of the first tranche of $30 Billion from the Provider Relief Funds authorized and appropriated under the CARES Act and deposited within HHS’s Public Health and Social Services Emergency Fund.  The funds released in this tranche are different from the previously announced Accelerated and Advanced Payment Program … Continue Reading

Desperate Times, Desperate Measures: Elective Medical Procedures Banned, PPEs at Risk of Confiscation

In an effort to conserve the state’s medical supplies and equipment, specifically personal protective equipment (PPE), Washington and Oregon (among other states) have banned non-urgent, elective procedures.[1] A move that the states hope will help ensure adequate supply of PPE and other medical equipment (e.g., ventilators) to address the COVID-19 pandemic. Here is a comparative … Continue Reading

New Oregon Telehealth Rules to Assist Providers with COVID-19 Pandemic Efforts (Updated March 31, 2020)

Several updates have made by the Oregon Health Authority (“OHA”) and the Health Evidence Review Commission (“HERC”) since this alert was first posted.  The following is updated as of March 31, 2020. On March 16, 2020, the Oregon Health Authority (“OHA”) issued a new temporary emergency rule revising OAR 410-130-0610 – OHA’s Medicaid telehealth reimbursement … Continue Reading
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